Babycenter HEALTH Baby possum on the prowl: Baby possums are on the rise, and they’re here to stay

Baby possum on the prowl: Baby possums are on the rise, and they’re here to stay

Baby possems are growing in popularity in the United States, and the number of baby possums living in the wild is on the increase, according to a report from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Baby possumes are typically smaller than a guinea pig, and can weigh as little as a quarter pound.

Possums are not considered endangered, but they are not the only animals that are threatened by the expansion of urbanization and development.

While the U of M has been hosting baby possum events in the past, it is the first time a group of people have been allowed to interact with a baby possuman in public.

“We have never had a baby python in the community,” said Kristina Cram, a university wildlife ecologist.

Cram and her team are hosting a baby snake show on Monday, April 7, at the University of Minnesota’s Pinnacle Campus. “

Our concern is for the young ones who might have a different relationship with humans that they have with their parents.”

Cram and her team are hosting a baby snake show on Monday, April 7, at the University of Minnesota’s Pinnacle Campus.

It will feature a live presentation of live snakes from around the world, a live snake show, a hands-on demonstration and an interactive quiz.

The event will also include a special presentation of baby snakes.

Cram said they hope to draw attention to the need to keep baby possuums in the home, but the goal is to get more people involved.

“I think this is an opportunity for people to show their support, their love and support for the snakes,” Cram told USA Today.

“It’s a really cool opportunity to do something really cool.”